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Stuart StevensonStuart Stevenson

 

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A Visit to Carn Fadrun

Stuart Stevenson


on
Vortigern Studies


...the view looking NE to the sea, the Rivals and Tre'r Ceiri (third from the left).The weather finally cleared from months of rain to snow and ice, but as it was also very clear and bright I set out last saturday to Carn Fadrun. I parked the car to the NE of the hill by a place called Madryn Castle (which is a former agricultural college) and followed the footpath marked on the map up the hill. The track led over the frozen ground which would have been muddy had it not been frozen.

The first picture was taken half way up and shows the view looking NE to the sea, the Rivals and Tre'r Ceiri (third from the left).

Following the path over a wall with a stone stile built into it, I managed to pick up the trail to the summit again on the south side, after about two hours of wandering and taking in the views. On the summit at the main site, I took a rest and ate my stew from my flask. Having forgotten to take a spoon, I had to make do with my fingers. Looking down onto the settlement remains, I thought this was rather apt. The next picture was taken about 30 metres SE of the trig point, looking NE. The other shows even more circles, looking SE.

... about 30 metres SE of the trig point, looking NE.
... about 30 metres SE of the trig point, looking NE. (click here to enlarge).

 

... about 30 metres SE of the trig point, looking NE.
... even more circles, looking SE. (click here to enlarge).

Descending again to the new layby and chapel, south of the top (as seen in the next picture), the path down to this layby is clear and takes around 35 to 40 minutes, maybe a little steep in places, but a good path. The next picture is taken right next to the chapel, which is called Garn Fadryn, and which has a date marked on it of 1812.

... south of the top...
... south of the top... (click here to enlarge).

 

... taken right next to the chapel, which is called Garn Fadryn...
... taken right next to the chapel, which is called Garn Fadryn... (click here to enlarge).

The next picture is looking to the top of Carn Fadrun again, and was taken from the layby. The colours are looking like paintbox colours, but they are as it really was. The first lamb I have seen this year can be seen in the middle of the picture. The next picture was taken from a track on the SW side, with some very old gate posts in the foreground which are less than 2 metres apart. From here I followed the path around Carn Fadrun, clockwise again, to finally join up where I had started and in doing so got to the top/down again and viewed the hill from all angles.

... to the top of Carn Fadrun again ... taken from the layby.
... to the top of Carn Fadrun again ... taken from the layby. (click here to enlarge).

 

... taken from a track on the SW side, with some very old gate posts in the foreground...
... taken from a track on the SW side, with some very old gate posts in the foreground... (click here to enlarge).

My next target is Garn Boduan, another settlement about 3 miles NE of Carn Fadrun, which I have been told covers about 10 acres against the 2.5 acres of Tre'r Ceiri. It has not as many huts, about 150, but we found the starting place and where to park but the light was going and it was freezing hard again. So, maybe another day, in which I also hope to include a walk up Gyrn Ddu, which is the hill facing Tre'r Ceiri.

Copyright 2003, Stuart Stevenson. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Comments to: Stuart Stevenson.


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